The Vivo X21 is a smartphone that is aimed at the mid-rangers market in China. The phone packs a Snapdragon 230 processor, 3GB of RAM, Android 8.1 Oreo, a dual rear camera setup on the back, and a 3.5mm headphone jack. The phone was released a few months ago and it costs CNY 1,000 ($150) in China.

This year has proven to be a great year for hardware and software. There have been some amazing launches like the #Google #Pixel 2, #Apple #iPhone #X and #Samsung #Galaxy S10. There have also been some pretty amazing releases from the #Nintendo #Switch, the #PlayStation #Pro, and even the #Nokia #8 Sirocco. With so many new hardware releases, that’s hard to keep up with them all. For this #review, I have chosen to focus on two devices, the #Vivo #2021 and the #Samsung #Galaxy #S10+. Both devices are brand new releases from #Vivo and #Samsung and are the most advanced phones they have ever released

Vivo is a smartphone brand owned by BBK Electronics, the parent firm of the Vivo smartphone brand. Vivo has been growing at a rapid pace in the global market, with a total revenue of over 2.5 billion US dollars in 2017. Vivo is known for the “selfie” camera which has features that are very similar to the iPhone X. And recently, Vivo launched the Vivo V9 with a triple camera for the first time.

VIVO REVIEW (2021)

Reviews of films

On Friday, August 6th, Netflix released Vivo, a new Sony Pictures Animation film. Vivo is Sony’s first animated musical, including lyrics by Lin-Manuel Miranda, a script by Quiara Alegra Hudes (In the Heights), and director Kirk DeMicco (The Croods). For me, Sony Pictures Animation has a shaky track record, with unexpectedly successful films like Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs and Arthur Christmas sandwiched between a plethora of atrocities against humanity like The Emoji Movie. They remind me a lot like DreamWorks in that they’re capable of amazing creative achievements but choose to produce trash most of the time. However, I believe they’ve been on a roll since the release of Into The Spider-Verse in 2018. Over the Moon and The Mitchells vs. The Machines were two of my favorite films, and Wish Dragon was also enjoyable. Vivo was a must-see for me because of Lin-Manuel Miranda’s participation, but can it measure up to his previous musicals? Let’s take a closer look.

Vivo

Vivo (Lin-Manuel Miranda) is a singing and dancing kinkajou, or “honey bear,” a tropical jungle animal. Vivo was rescued as a newborn and adopted by Andrés Hernandez (Juan de Marcos González), a Cuban musician. Marta Sandoval (Gloria Estefan), Andrés’ former musical partner and now a famous singer on the brink of retirement, writes him a note. Andrés is invited to her final performance, and she tells him that she loves him and wants them to perform together. Andrés has been waiting for these words and is getting ready to go to Miami, but catastrophe will prevent him from seeing his love again. Vivo sets off on a trip to bring a song Andrés composed for Marta, but he quickly realizes he’ll need assistance to accomplish his mission.

Vivo

Vivo’s animation follows Sony’s tradition of technological excellence. From beginning to end, this film is stunning; the character designs are distinct and eccentric while remaining visually appealing (with one exception). Vivo’s graphics are bright, colorful, and inventive. Vivo’s environment seems lived-in, but not in a bad way. The title of the film and its protagonist are both appropriate since the whole experience is energizing. Dream sequences in which Andrés and Marta reconnect in a new animation style are some of my favorite moments in the film. I’m a sucker for animated movie scenes like this, and the layered 2D aesthetic here is really beautiful. I particularly like the difference between the appearance and atmosphere of Cuba and Miami once Vivo and Andrés’ family arrive. For the most part, I also like the music. The songs “Mambo Cabana,” “Keep the Beat,” and “One More Song” are all catchy and enjoyable to listen to. “My Own Drum” is a piece of trash that really fits in with a lot of my problems with Vivo, which I’ll get to later. I like Lin-Manuel Miranda, and his presence as a composer was one of the things that drew me to Vivo, so I’m not shocked that the most of the songs are excellent. I anticipate to become fonder of them with time, as I did with Hamilton, In the Heights, and even Moana. Alex Lacamoire created Vivo’s original soundtrack, which is equally beautiful.

Vivo

Vivo also has a diverse range of vocal ability. The film also stars Zoe Saldana, Michael Rooker, Brian Tyree Henry, Nicole Byer, and Leslie David Baker, in addition to Miranda, Estefan, and González. Ynairaly Simo plays Vivo’s co-star, Andrés’ great-niece Gabi. Gabi captures a lot of my main concerns with Vivo as a film. As previously said, I dislike her attitude, character design, and song, “My Own Drum.” She’s obnoxious, self-absorbed, certain that she’s always right, and she never learns anything in the end. Rosa (Saldana) is the one who discovers that Gabi was correct all along. Many animated family films have this issue, particularly when the kid protagonist only has one surviving parent. Rosa wants Gabi to be a Girl Scout, but Gabi wants to be different and go on adventures. Gabi’s mother even attempts to reach an agreement with her, allowing her to have a terrible purple undercut in the hopes that she would comply with her Girl Scout group. This might be a fun approach to add nuance or illustrate how the two struggle as a family without the father’s moderating presence. But, as is customary, it’s a “be yourself” story in which the parent is the antagonist. Gabi wants to assist Vivo in getting Andrés’ music to Marta since she has never been able to express her affection for her father. Andrés’ need to tell Marta how he feels mirrors her own predicament. Gabi’s father is only mentioned a handful of times, and we never see him in flashbacks or anything like that, so this doesn’t work very well.

Vivo

Vivo’s connection with Gabi isn’t as solid or genuine as his friendship with Andrés. That’s saying a lot, since Andrés dies early on and Vivo spends the remainder of the movie with Gabi. Gabi’s demeanor is extremely irritating, and I felt terrible for Vivo throughout the whole of the movie. They make it seem like the two simply need to get accustomed to one other, but the execution falls short. I don’t dislike Ynairaly Simo, but this character is awful, and I’m not sure why we’re meant to like or cheer for Gabi. Katie from The Mitchells vs. The Machines did a much better job with a comparable character. Katie was eccentric and dressed in gaudy garb, and she even had Gabi’s hairdo. As a protagonist, though, she remained appealing and unexpectedly sympathetic. Katie’s connection with her parents was also handled well in that film. Katie’s brother Aaron, too, was a charming oddball. The film is further hampered by Vivo’s side characters, such as the Girl Scouts and the birds Vivo befriends. They’re simply filler, and they’re neither humorous nor fascinating. I wish I could have used this time to further develop Gabi or perhaps give Vivo more time with Andrés before he passed away. Vivo, on the other hand, is a compelling character in his own right. He’s hilarious, and his connection with his owner is genuine, and he’s voiced by one of my favorite performers. His quest to fulfill Andrés’ last request is both noble and moving to see.

Overall, I like Vivo, but I don’t love it. Vivo is a visual feast with several catchy songs, a commendable voice cast, and good ideas behind its story. I wish the characters besides Vivo and Andrés were more likable, especially since the latter is barely in the movie. But for all this film’s warts, its heart is in the right place, and I had a good time. It’s no Mitchells vs. The Machines, but I like it about as well as Wish Dragon.

7.5 out of 10 for plot
Acting – 9 points
8 – Music/Sound
Editing/Direction – 8
7.5 for animation and character development

8

Good

Vivo is a lovely film with an upbeat music. It has a few flaws with its side characters, but it’s still a fun movie.

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